Disney World at Easter

Disney World at Easter




We have started booking our trip to Disney World for the week over Easter of 2013. I have read a lot about how the crowds are at an all time high this time of year compared to other times. It is really the only time that works for us, but with the large crowds am getting a little nervous about our 6 year old that has type 1 diabetes and having problems with his blood sugar being high and low while waiting in long lines. My question is do you think this is something they will help us with and when the crowds are this large do you still get a chance to see everything? Thanks!

See the Easter Bunny

Mr. and Mrs. Easter Bunny together

Photo by Samantha Decker

Dad’s Under Control Answer


You certainly face a few challenges with your trip, but don’t worry – with Dad’s help you can have everything under control. The key is to get to the parks early, know what your must-sees are, and make sure you manage your child’s diabetes. If you can do all three of these things, you’ll have a Perfect Vacation.

Easter is going to be packed, I’m talking wall-to-wall crowds no two ways about it. In fact, all of Walt Disney World will be super busy the week before and after, as for many families just like yours it’s the only time of the year that it’s possible to take a trip. It’s an incredibly crowded time, you’ll wait a long time for all rides, a really long time for the big ones, and you’ll even stand in queues for fast food.

Dad’s March Crowd Calendar

But, there are a number of things you can do to keep your cool when it comes to crowds. Most importantly, be an early bird – get to the park early, before opening. You’ll be surprised by how much you can get done in those first few hours before lunch. If you’re staying at a Walt Disney World resort hotel, make use of Extra Magic Hours. And of course, use the FASTPASS system to your advantage!

You probably won’t see everything (in all his trips even Dad still hasn’t seen EVERYTHING) but you can see a lot. Do your research and make a list of priorities – must sees, maybes, and things you don’t mind to miss. Tackle the list from the top priorities down to avoid disappointment.

You might also want to consider some professional help. The folks at Touringplans.com have great suggested itineraries for holiday park touring, and you can even customize plans based on your family’s list of must-sees! Their Lines app can help you navigate the crowds while you’re in the parks too!

Dad’s Touringplans.com Page”

Like I said, crowds are going to be huge even when it comes to food – so if you plan on any table service meals, you need to make your Advanced Dining Reservations at the 180 day mark. This especially applies to character dining, and I’d recommend booking a meal or two with your child’s favorite characters – it means you won’t spend hours in line to meet them, and you get to have a relaxed meal at the same time!

Managing your child’s diabetes is very important, but accommodating this at Disney shouldn’t be much different than what you do day to day as long as you’re prepared. Keep a close eye on things and make sure you have snacks and insulin with you at all times, and ensure you don’t neglect proper management of the blood sugar levels by getting sidetracked with the fun. Above all be safe, and if you child is experiencing a problem and needs to step out of line, do so immediately.

When you arrive, go to Guest Relations and explain your situation – you may be issued a Guest Assistance Card. No, this isn’t a magical front of the line pass, but it may allow your party to use alternate entrances to many attractions, possibly reducing your wait time and providing a more comfortable environment in which to wait for your turn to ride.

Dad's Bottom Line

Dawn, don’t be overwhelmed by the challenges you face on this trip. Do your best to be prepared before you get to the parks, and then concentrate on having fun with your family when you get there!

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